Month: March 2017

Principles of Entrepreneurship

Principles of Entrepreneurship

Who can become an entrepreneur? There is no one definitive profile. Successful entrepreneurs come in various ages, income levels, gender, and race. They differ in education and experience. But research indicates that most successful entrepreneurs share certain personal attributes, including: creativity, dedication, determination, flexibility, leadership, passion, self-confidence, and “smarts.”
Creativity is the spark that drives the development • of new products or services or ways to do business. It is the push for innovation and improvement. It is continuous learning, questioning, and thinking outside of prescribed formulas.
Dedication is what motivates the entrepreneur to • work hard, 12 hours a day or more, even seven days a week, especially in the beginning, to get the endeavor off the ground. Planning and ideas must be joined by hard work to succeed. Dedication makes it happen.
Determination is the extremely strong desire to • achieve success. It includes persistence and the ability to bounce back after rough times. It persuades the entrepreneur to make the 10th phone call, after nine have yielded nothing. For the true entrepreneur, money is not the motivation. Success is the motivator; money is the reward.
Flexibility is the ability to move quickly in response • to changing market needs. It is being true to a dream while also being mindful of market realities. A story is told about an entrepreneur who started a fancy shop selling only French pastries. But customers wanted to buy muffins as well. Rather than risking the loss of these customers, the entrepreneur modified her vision to accommodate these needs.
Leadership is the ability to create rules and to set • goals. It is the capacity to follow through to see that rules are followed and goals are accomplished.
Passion is what gets entrepreneurs started and • keeps them there. It gives entrepreneurs the ability to convince others to believe in their vision. It can’t substitute for planning, but it will help them to stay focused and to get others to look at their plans.
Self-confidence comes from thorough planning, • which reduces uncertainty and the level of risk. It also comes from expertise. Self-confidence gives the entrepreneur the ability to listen without being easily swayed or intimidated.
“Smarts” consists of common sense joined with • knowledge or experience in a related business or endeavor. The former gives a person good instincts, the latter, expertise. Many people have smarts they don’t recognize. A person who successfully keeps a household on a budget has organizational and financial skills. Employment, education, and life experiences all contribute to smarts.
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Every entrepreneur has these qualities in different degrees. But what if a person lacks one or more? Many skills can be learned. Or, someone can be hired who has strengths that the entrepreneur lacks. The most important strategy is to be aware of strengths and to build on them.

What leads a person to strike out on his own and start a business? Perhaps a person has been laid off once or more. Sometimes a person is frustrated with his or her current job and doesn’t see any better career prospects on the horizon. Sometimes a person realizes that his or her job is in jeopardy. A firm may be contemplating cutbacks that could end a job or limit career or salary prospects. Perhaps a person already has been passed over for promotion. Perhaps a person sees no opportunities in existing businesses for someone with his or her interests and skills.
Some people are actually repulsed by the idea of working for someone else. They object to a system where reward is often based on seniority rather than accomplishment, or where they have to conform to a corporate culture.
Other people decide to become entrepreneurs because they are disillusioned by the bureaucracy or politics involved in getting ahead in an established business or profession. Some are tired of trying to promote a product, service, or way of doing business that is outside the mainstream operations of a large company.
In contrast, some people are attracted to entrepreneurship by the advantages of starting a business. These include:
Entrepreneurs are their own bosses. They make • the decisions. They choose whom to do business with and what work they will do. They decide what hours to work, as well as what to pay and whether to take vacations.
Entrepreneurship offers a greater possibility of • achieving significant financial rewards than working for someone else.
It provides the ability to be involved in the total • operation of the business, from concept to design and creation, from sales to business operations and customer response.
It offers the prestige of being the person in • charge.
It gives an individual the opportunity to build eq• uity, which can be kept, sold, or passed on to the next generation.
Entrepreneurship creates an opportunity for a • person to make a contribution. Most new entrepreneurs help the local economy. A few—through their innovations—contribute to society as a whole. One example is entrepreneur Steve Jobs, who co-founded Apple in 1976, and the subsequent revolution in desktop computers.
Some people evaluate the possibilities for jobs and careers where they live and make a conscious decision to pursue entrepreneurship.
No one reason is more valid than another; none guarantee success. However, a strong desire to start a business, combined with a good idea, careful planning, and hard work, can lead to a very engaging and profitable endeavor.

Economy Growth

Economy Growth

Economic growth is central to economic development. When national income grows, real people benefit. While there is no known formula for stimulating economic growth, data can help policy-makers better understand their countries’ economic situations and guide any work toward improvement. Data here covers measures of economic growth, such as gross domestic product (GDP) and gross national income (GNI). It also includes indicators representing factors known to be relevant to economic growth, such as capital stock, employment, investment, savings, consumption, government spending, imports, and exports.

What is ‘Economic Growth’

Economic growth is an increase in the capacity of an economy to produce goods and services, compared from one period of time to another. It can be measured in nominal or real terms, the latter of which is adjusted for inflation. Traditionally, aggregate economic growth is measured in terms of gross national product (GNP) or gross domestic product (GDP), although alternative metrics are sometimes used.

BREAKING DOWN ‘Economic Growth’

In simplest terms, economic growth refers to an increase in aggregate productivity. Often, but not necessarily, aggregate gains in productivity correlate with increased average marginal productivity. This means the average laborer in a given economy becomes, on average, more productive. It is also possible to achieve aggregate economic growth without an increased average marginal productivity through extra immigration or higher birth rates.

Read more: Economic Growth Definition | Investopedia http://www.investopedia.com/terms/e/economicgrowth.asp#ixzz4RSX62ioK
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BREAKING DOWN ‘Economic Growth’

In simplest terms, economic growth refers to an increase in aggregate productivity. Often, but not necessarily, aggregate gains in productivity correlate with increased average marginal productivity. This means the average laborer in a given economy becomes, on average, more productive. It is also possible to achieve aggregate economic growth without an increased average marginal productivity through extra immigration or higher birth rates.

Read more: Economic Growth Definition | Investopedia http://www.investopedia.com/terms/e/economicgrowth.asp#ixzz4RSX62ioK
Follow us: Investopedia on Facebook

Read more: Economic Growth Definition | Investopedia http://www.investopedia.com/terms/e/economicgrowth.asp#ixzz4RSWxnJuT
Follow us: Investopedia on Facebook

OPEN DATA

OPEN DATA

Open Data is data that can be freely used, shared and built-on by anyone, anywhere, for any NON harmful use for a greater social impact.

Section 32(1) of the Constitution confers on “everyone” a right of access to “(a) any information held by the state; and (b) any information that is held by another person and that is required for the exercise or protection of any rights.”

The full Open Definition gives precise details as to what this means. To summarize the most important open data focuses on:

  • Availability and Access: the data must be available as a whole and at no more than a reasonable reproduction cost, preferably by downloading over the internet. The data must also be available in a convenient and modifiable form.
  • Re-use and Redistribution: the data must be provided under terms that permit re-use and redistribution including the intermixing with other datasets.
  • Universal Participation: everyone must be able to use, re-use and redistribute – there should be no discrimination against fields of endeavour or against persons or groups. For example, ‘non-commercial’ restrictions that would prevent ‘commercial’ use, or restrictions of use for certain purposes (e.g. only in education), are not allowed.